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Quotes and Miscellaneous Information

by Paul Ridenour

Quote about a speech by Major Ridge:
"I knew not what he said but I cried for the eloquence of the man." - Thomas Jefferson

Sarah Ridge once got on a wild horse and she continued riding it until the horse's spirit was broken. At that point, more than one white man wanted to marry her.

Once Emily Agnes Paschal was riding a horse bareback while standing. Sarah's 2nd husband Charles Pix was worried. Sarah Ridge was not worried at all.

Major Ridge voted most influential man of Northern Georgia. http://ngeorgia.com/feature/people.html

People come from all over the world to see Major Ridge's house - The Chieftains Museum.  However, the Japanese, British, and Germans are the most interested. They have pictures of Major Ridge in their homes. They save their entire lives to take a vacation to see his home.

Major Ridge's wife Susie Wickett loved to smoke a pipe. She would not attend white functions if she could not smoke her pipe.

Major Ridge was glad that his wife and so many Cherokees became Christians. He said "she has chosen the good part."

"As a small girl on the plantation in Georgia, a frequent visitor of her father's was Congressman Sam Houston of Tennessee, who made quite a pet of the little girl.  When he was in Washington attending Congress and Ridge would go there on tribal affairs, he would take little Sarah along in his carriage.  Then the young Congressman would come to the boarding house and get his little friend, and they would go hand in hand over Washington to see the sights.  As to the friendship between little Sarah Ridge and Sam Houston, that was renewed after Mrs. Paschal came to Texas in 1848, and has continued through Agnes McNeir and myself, since her girlhood and my young manhood, back in 1903.  The old General's daughter, Mrs. Nettie Houston Bringhurst, was a splendid lady, and her daughter, Nettie Houston Bringhurst, at sixteen was a lovely girl.  So the families have been friends for over a hundred and forty years."    -  Paschal McNeir, great grandson of Major Ridge, untitled biography of Sarah Ridge by George Paschal McNeir

"Cherokee blood, if not destroyed, will win its courses in beings of fair complexions, who will read that their ancestors became civilized under the frowns of misfortune & the causes of their enemies." - John Ridge, excerpt from a letter to Albert Gallatin, a member of Thomas Jefferson's staff - February 27, 1826

John Ridge:
"Major Ridge (has with) distinguished zeal and ability served his country. He saw it was on the precipice of ruin, ready to tumble down. He (has) told of their danger. Did he tell truth or not? Let every man look at our circumstances and judge for himself. (Is) a man to be denounced for his opinions? If a man (sees) a cloud charged with rain, thunder and storm ... (and urges) the people to take care ... is that man to be hated or ... respected? Foreman (has) told untruths to prejudice your minds against certain men to gratify his malice. The Delegation (has) given us a candid report - I believe they (have) hid nothing from us. It offered no hope of relief against our suffering country. Why should we embitter each others feelings. But, if the presence of Major Ridge and myself in (this) Council, which we thought was ours also, is disagreeable to you we know how to stay away.  What would become of our Nation if we were all like Tom Foreman? Could any good grow out of our Councils? We should now fall together and twist each others noses. Our eyes would not remain in their sockets, but in general we (would) gouge them out."

Major Ridge:
"It may be that Foreman has better expectations that he should, in slandering men, establish his fame among you. But I have no expectations that he will enjoy it long, for we have no government. It is entirely suppressed. Where are your laws! The seats of your judges are overturned. When I look upon you all, I hear you laugh at me. When harsh words are uttered by men who know better ... I feel, on your account, oppressed with sorrow. I mourn over your calamity, and fatal delusion in which you are bound......"

From the Moravian Journal, Nov.23, 1814
"Ridge and several Indians came. They were well-behaved, friendly, and quite talkative and used the ENGLISH language. It is so strange that the poor Indians do not seem to understand or be able to speak English except when they are drunk."

"Stand Watie's actions in the Second Battle of Cabin Creek earned him universal accolades throughout the Confederacy. General Douglas issued a proclamation highlighting his valor and courage:

The brilliancy and completeness of this expedition has not been excelled in the history of the war. Firm, brave and confident, the officers had but to order and the men cheerfully executed. The whole having been conducted with perfect harmony between the war-torn veteran Stand Watie, the chivalrous Gano, and their respective commands."

Sarah Watie once said, "I don't believe I could live one year longer if I knew that we could not be settled...I am so perfectly sick of the world."

"The Georgians have shown a grasping spirit lately;...I know the Indians have an older title than theirs....Yet they are strong and we are weak. We are few, they are many. We cannot remain here in safety and comfort. I know we love the graves of our fathers....We can never forget these homes, I know, but an unbending, iron necessity tells us we must leave them...There is but one path of safety, one road to future existence as a Nation. That path is open before you. Make a treaty of cession. Give up these lands and go over beyond the great Father of Waters" - Major Ridge

"As a small girl on the plantation in Georgia, a frequent visitor of her father's was Congressman Sam Houston of Tennessee, who made quite a pet of the little girl.  When he was in Washington attending Congress and Ridge would go there on tribal affairs, he would take little Sarah along in his carriage.  Then the young Congressman would come to the boarding house and get his little friend, and they would go hand in hand over Washington to see the sights.  As to the friendship between little Sarah Ridge and Sam Houston, that was renewed after Mrs. Paschal came to Texas in 1848, and has continued through Agnes McNeir and myself, since her girlhood and my young manhood, back in 1903.  The old General's daughter, Mrs. Nettie Houston Bringhurst, was a splendid lady, and her daughter, Nettie Houston Bringhurst, at sixteen was a lovely girl.  So the families have been friends for over a hundred and forty years."    -  Paschal McNeir, great grandson of Major Ridge